BRUCE ROSEMAN, M.D.
330 WEST 58th Street .# 408    NY NY 10019
M-F 9:00-5:15     Wed  12-8
New Telephone: (212) 957-8256  Cell/VM  1-917-414-3201
New Fax: (212) 265-2616
Hospital:  Mt. Sinai  (click for info)
BRUCE ROSEMAN, M.D.
NICOLE LIVESCU, R.N.
TEST YOURSELF

Test Your Sleep IQ
The following statements are designed to test your knowledge of sleep and its function. Decide whether each statement is true or false and then read the explanations that follow.
If you prefer, you can read all the questions and answers at once.
1. Sleep is a time when your body and brain shut down for rest and relaxation.
ANSWER: TRUE or FALSE?
2. If you regularly doze off unintentionally during the day, you may need more than just a good night's sleep.
ANSWER: TRUE or FALSE?
3. If you snore loudly and persistently at night and are sleepy during the day, you may have a sleep disorder.
ANSWER: TRUE or FALSE?
4. Opening the car window or turning the radio up will keep a drowsy driver awake.
ANSWER: TRUE or FALSE?
5. Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder marked by "sleep attacks".
ANSWER: TRUE or FALSE?
6. The primary cause of insomnia is worry.
ANSWER: TRUE or FALSE?
7. One cause of not getting enough sleep is restless legs syndrome.
ANSWER: TRUE or FALSE?
8. The body has a natural ability to adjust to different sleep schedules such as working different shifts or traveling through multiple time zones quickly.
ANSWER: TRUE or FALSE?
9. People need less sleep as they grow older.
ANSWER: TRUE or FALSE?
10. More people doze off at the wheel of a car in the early morning or midafternoon than in the evening.
ANSWER: TRUE or FALSE?
11. The average teenager needs about 8 hours of sleep every night.
ANSWER: TRUE or FALSE?
12. You can make up for lost sleep by drinking caffeinated soft drinks or coffee.
ANSWER: TRUE or FALSE?
13. Lack of sleep can affect performance in school, on the job, in sports, and can even make a difference in how you look.
ANSWER: TRUE or FALSE?
14. Teenagers just naturally want to go to bed late and get up late.
ANSWER: TRUE or FALSE?
15. Sleeping late on the weekends will make up for lost sleep during the week.
ANSWER: TRUE or FALSE?
16. Driving while drowsy (struggling to stay awake) is a significant factor in traffic crashes.
ANSWER: TRUE or FALSE?
17. Even a small amount of alcohol when someone is sleepy can make sleepiness worse.
ANSWER: TRUE or FALSE?


Answers
1. Sleep is a time when your body and brain shut down for rest and relaxation: FALSE
Although it is a time when your body rests and restores its energy levels, sleep is an active state that affects both your physical and mental well-being. Adequate restful sleep is critical to good health. Insufficient restful sleep can result in various mental and physical health problems.
On to #2
2. If you regularly doze off unintentionally during the day, you may need more than just a good night's sleep: TRUE
Many people doze off unintentionally during the day despite getting their usual night of sleep. This could be a sign of a sleep disorder. Approximately 40 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders, including obstructive sleep apnea, insomnia, narcolepsy, and restless legs syndrome. An untreated sleep disorder can reduce your daytime productivity, increase your risk of accidents, and put you at risk for illness and even early death.
On to #3
3. If you snore loudly and persistently at night and are sleepy during the day, you may have a sleep disorder: TRUE
Persistent loud snoring at night and daytime sleepiness are the main symptoms of a common and serious sleep disorder, sleep apnea. Another symptom is frequent long pauses in breathing during sleep, followed by choking and gasping for breath. People with sleep apnea don't get enough restful sleep, and their daytime performance is often seriously affected. Sleep apnea may also lead to hypertension, heart disease, heart attack, and stroke. However, it can be treated, and the sleep apnea patient can live a normal life.
On to #4
4. Opening the car window or turning the radio up will keep the drowsy driver awake: FALSE
Opening the car window or turning the radio up may arouse a driver briefly, but this won't keep that person alert behind the wheel. Even mild drowsiness is enough to reduce concentration and reaction time. The sleep-deprived driver may nod off for a couple of seconds at a time without even knowing it -- enough time to hurt themselves or someone else. It has been estimated that drowsy driving may account for an average of 56,000 reported accidents each year -- claiming over 1,500 lives.
On to #5
5. Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder marked by "sleep attacks." : TRUE
People with narcolepsy fall asleep uncontrollably -- at any time of the day, in all types of situations -- regardless of the amount or quality of sleep they've had the night before. Narcolepsy is characterized by these "sleep attacks," as well as by daytime sleepiness, episodes of muscle weakness or paralysis, and disrupted nighttime sleep. Although there is no known cure, medications and behavioral treatments can control symptoms, and people with narcolepsy can live normal lives.
On to #6
6. The primary cause of insomnia is worry: FALSE
Insomnia has many different causes, including physical and mental conditions and stress. Insomnia is the perception that you don't get enough sleep because you can't fall asleep or stay asleep or get back to sleep once you've awakened during the night. It affects people of all ages, usually for just an occasional night or two, but sometimes for weeks, months, or even years. Because insomnia can become a chronic problem, it is important to get it diagnosed and treated if it persists for more than a month.
On to #7
7. One cause of not getting enough sleep is restless legs syndrome: TRUE
Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a medical condition distinguished by tingling sensations in the legs -- and sometimes the arms -- while sitting or lying still, especially at bedtime. The person with RLS needs to constantly stretch or move the legs to try to relieve these uncomfortable or painful symptoms. As a result, he or she has difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep and usually feels extremely sleepy and unable to function fully during the day. Good sleep habits and medication can help those with RLS.
On to #8
8. The body has a natural ability to adjust to different sleep schedules such as working different shifts or traveling through multiple time zones quickly: FALSE
The human body's biological clock programs each person to feel sleepy during the nighttime hours and to be active during the daylight hours. So people who work the night shift and try to sleep during the day are constantly fighting their biological clocks. This puts them at a risk of error and accident at work and of disturbed sleep. The same is true for people who travel through multiple time zones quickly; they get "jet lag" because they cannot maintain a regular sleep-wake schedule. Sleeping during the day in a dark, quiet bedroom and getting exposure to sufficient bright light at the right time can help improve daytime alertness.
On to #9
9. People need less sleep as they grow older: FALSE
As we get older, we don't need less sleep, but we often get less sleep. That's because our ability to sleep for long periods of time and to get into the deep restful stages of sleep decreases with age. Older people have more fragile sleep and are more easily disturbed by light, noise, and pain. They also may have medical conditions that contribute to sleep problems. Going to bed at the same time every night and getting up at the same time every morning, getting exposure to natural outdoor light during the day, and sleeping in a cool, dark, quiet place at night may help.
On to #10
10. More people doze off at the wheel of a car in the early morning or mid-afternoon than in the evening: TRUE
Our bodies are programmed by our biological clock to experience two natural periods of sleepiness during the 24-hour day, regardless of the amount of sleep we've had in the previous 24-hours. The primary period is between about midnight and 7:00 a.m. A second period of less intense sleepiness is in the mid-afternoon, between about 1:00 and 3:00 p.m. This means that we are more at risk of falling asleep at the wheel at these times than in the evening -- especially if we haven't been getting enough sleep.
On to #11
11. The average teenager needs about 8 hours of sleep every night: FALSE
Most teenagers need more sleep than their younger siblings and more than adults -- about 9 hours of sleep per night.
On to #12
12. You can make up for lost sleep by drinking caffeinated soft drinks or coffee: FALSE
While caffeinated drinks such as soft drinks and coffee may assist you in staying awake in the short run, they cannot help you make up lost sleep.
On to #13
13. Lack of sleep can affect performance in school, on the job, in sports, and can even make a difference in how you look: TRUE
Sleep deprived people can have difficulties in paying attention and concentrating. Lack of sleep can also affect your appearance.
On to #14
14. Teenagers just naturally want to go to bed late and get up late: TRUE
Research has shown that the biological clocks of teenagers push them toward later bed times and later rising times.
On to #15
15. Sleeping late on the weekends will make up for lost sleep during the week: FALSE
You may not be able to catch up on lost sleep in only one or two nights. It usually takes several nights of refreshing sleep to return your body to normal.
On to #16
16. Driving while drowsy (struggling to stay awake) is a significant factor in traffic crashes: TRUE
According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, approximately 56,000 police-reported crashes per year result from drivers who were fatigued or asleep behind the wheel.
On to #17
17. Even a small amount of alcohol when someone is sleepy can make sleepiness worse: TRUE
When sleep-deprived, the effects of just one drink of alcohol can have the same effect as several drinks when fully rested.
This Sleep Intelligence Test was created by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.



5 minute hearing test
Give yourself the following points for each answer to the questions below:
Almost always = 3 oints
Half the time = 2 oints
Occasionally = 1 point
Never = 0 points

1. I have a problem hearing over the telephone...
2. I have trouble following the conversation when two or more people are talking at the same time...
3. People complain that I turn the TV volume too high...
4. I have to strain to understand conversations...
5. I miss hearing some common sounds like the phone or the doorbell ringing...
6. I have trouble hearing conversations in a noisy background such as a party...
7. I get confused about where sounds come from...
8. I misunderstand some words in a sentence and need to ask people to repeat themselves...
9. I especially have trouble understanding the speech of women and children...
10. I have worked in noisy environments (assembly lines, jackhammers, jet engines, etc.)...
11. I hear fine - if people just speak clearly...
12. People get annoyed because I misunderstand what they say...
13. I misunderstand what others are saying and make inappropriate responses...
14. I avoid social activities because I cannot hear well and fear I'll reply improperly...
15. If you have a blood relative who has hearing loss, add three points...
16. To be answered by a family member or friend: Do you think this person has a hearing loss?...
Your Score =
0-5 Your hearing is fine and no action is required.
6-9 We suggest that you have your hearing evaluated by an Audiologist.
10 We strongly recommend that you have your hearing evaluated by an Audiologist.




YOUR SMOKING IQ                   
TRUE or FALSE?                          


SCORE:  _______________________ Count the number you got right.
Your SMOKING IQ:
____     Score 9: 150 IQ    Genius  
____     Score 8: 120 IQ    Above Average 
____     Score 7:  100 IQ   Average
____     Score below 6     To raise your IQ, learn more:


Call 1 800 NY QUITS (1 800 697-8487)
Visit www.cdc.gov/tobacco     www.health.gov/healthypeople

“Smoking IQ Test” developed by ascott@liu.edu   3/24/2003   Anne Scott, PhD, OTR, FAOTA 
Note:  The answers to all questions are TRUE!



ADHD Symptom Checklist
Below is a checklist containing 18 items which describe characteristics frequently found in people with ADHD. Items 1-9 describe characteristics of inattention. Items 10-15 describe characteristics of hyperactivity. Items 16-18 describe characteristics of impulsivity.

In the space before each statement put the number that best describes your child’s (your student’s) behavior (0=never or rarely; 1 = sometimes; 2 = often; 3 = very often).

___1. Fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, work, or other activities.

___2. Has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play activities.

___3. Does not seem to listen when spoken to directly.

___4. Does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (not due to oppositional behavior or failure to understand instructions).

___5. Has difficulty organizing tasks and activities.

___6. Avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to engage in tasks that require sustained mental effort (such as schoolwork or homework).

___7. Loses things necessary for tasks or activities (e.g., toys, school assignments, pencils, books, or tools).

___8. Is easily distracted by extraneous stimuli.

___9. Is often forgetful in daily activities.

___10. Fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in seat.

___11. Leaves seat in classroom or in other situations in which remaining seated is expected.

___12. Runs about or climbs excessively in situations in which it is inappropriate (in adolescents or adults, may be limited to subjective feelings of restlessness).

___13. Has difficulty playing or engaging in leisure activities quietly.

___14. Is “on the go” or often acts as if “driven by a motor.”

___15. Talks excessively.

___16. Blurts out answers before questions have been completed.

___17. Has difficulty awaiting his or her turn.

___18. Interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations or games).


Count the number of items in each group (inattention items 1-9 and hyperactivity-impulsivity items 10-18) you marked “2” or “3.” If six or more items are marked “2” or “3” in each group this could indicate serious problems in the groups marked.


CHOLESTEROL AND HEART DISEASE I.Q.
Prepared by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
Are you cholesterol smart? Test your knowledge about high blood cholesterol with the following statements. Circle each true or false. The answers are given on the back of this sheet.

1. High blood cholesterol is one of the risk factors for heart disease that you can do something about. T F
2. To lower your blood cholesterol level you must stop eating meat altogether. T F
3. Any blood cholesterol level below 240 mg/dL is desirable for adults. T F
4. Fish oil supplements are recommended to lower blood cholesterol. T F
5. To lower your blood cholesterol level you should eat less saturated fat, total fat, and cholesterol, and lose weight if you are overweight. T F
6. Saturated fats raise your blood cholesterol level more than anything else in your diet. T F
7. All vegetable oils help lower blood cholesterol levels. T F
8. Lowering blood cholesterol levels can help people who have already had a heart attack. T F
9. All children need to have their blood cholesterol levels checked. T F
10. Women don't need to worry about high blood cholesterol and heart disease. T F
11. Reading food labels can help you eat the heart healthy way. T F

How cholesterol smart are you?

Answers to the Cholesterol and Heart Disease I.Q. Quiz
1. True. High blood cholesterol is one of the risk factors for heart disease that a person can do something about. High blood pressure, cigarette smoking, diabetes, overweight, and physical inactivity are the others.
2. False. Although some red meat is high in saturated fat and cholesterol, which can raise your blood cholesterol, you do not need to stop eating it or any other single food. Red meat is an important source of protein, iron, and other vitamins and minerals. You should, however, cut back on the amount of saturated fat and cholesterol that you eat. One way to do this is by choosing lean cuts of meat with the fat trimmed. Another way is to watch your portion sizes and eat no more than 6 ounces of meat a day. Six ounces is about the size of two decks of playing cards.
3.  False. A total blood cholesterol level of under 200 mg/dL is desirable and usually puts you at a lower risk for heart disease. A blood cholesterol level of 240 mg/dL is high and increases your risk of heart disease. If your cholesterol level is high, your doctor will want to check your level of LDL-cholesterol ("bad" cholesterol). A HIGH level of LDL-cholesterol increases your risk of heart disease, as does a LOW level of HDL-cholesterol ("good" cholesterol). An HDL-cholesterol level below 35 mg/dL is considered a risk factor for heart disease. A total cholesterol level of 200-239 mg/dL is considered borderline-high and usually increases your risk for heart disease. All adults 20 years of age or older should have their blood cholesterol level checked at least once every 5 years. 
4.  False. Fish oils are a source of omega-3 fatty acids, which are a type of polyunsaturated fat. Fish oil supplements generally do not reduce blood cholesterol levels. Also, the effect of the long-term use of fish oil supplements is not known. However, fish is a good food choice because it is low in saturated fat. 
5.  True. Eating less fat, especially saturated fat, and cholesterol can lower your blood cholesterol level. Generally your blood cholesterol level should begin to drop a few weeks after you start on a cholesterol-lowering diet. How much your level drops depends on the amounts of saturated fat and cholesterol you used to eat, how high your blood cholesterol is, how much weight you lose if you are overweight, and how your body responds to the changes you make. Over time, you may reduce your blood cholesterol level by 10-50 mg/dL or even more.
6.  True. Saturated fats raise your blood cholesterol level more than anything else. So, the best way to reduce your cholesterol level is to cut back on the amount of saturated fats that you eat. These fats are found in largest amounts in animal products such as butter, cheese, whole milk, ice cream, cream, and fatty meats. They are also found in some vegetable oils--coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils.
7.  False. Most vegetable oils--canola, corn, olive, safflower, soybean, and sunflower oils--contain mostly monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, which help lower blood cholesterol when used in place of saturated fats. However, a few vegetable oils-- coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils--contain more saturated fat than unsaturated fat. A special kind of fat, called "trans fat," is formed when vegetable oil is hardened to become margarine or shortening, through a process called "hydrogenation." The harder the margarine or shortening, the more likely it is to contain more trans fat. Choose margarine containing liquid vegetable oil as the first ingredient. Just be sure to limit the total amount of any fats or oils, since even those that are unsaturated are rich sources of calories. 
8.  True. People who have had one heart attack are at much higher risk for a second attack. Reducing blood cholesterol levels can greatly slow down (and, in some people, even reverse) the buildup of cholesterol and fat in the wall of the coronary arteries and significantly reduce the chances of a second heart attack. If you have had a heart attack or have coronary heart disease, your LDL level should be around 100 mg/dL which is even lower than the recommended level of less than 130 mg/dL for the general population. 
9.  False. Children from "high risk" families, in which a parent has high blood cholesterol (240 mg/dL or above) or in which a parent or grandparent has had heart disease at an early age (at 55 years or younger), should have their cholesterol levels tested. If a child from such a family has a cholesterol level that is high, it should be lowered under medical supervision, primarily with diet, to reduce the risk of developing heart disease as an adult. For most children, who are not from high-risk families, the best way to reduce the risk of adult heart disease is to follow a low saturated fat, low cholesterol eating pattern. All children over the age of 2 years and all adults should adopt a heart healthy eating pattern as a principal way of reducing coronary heart disease. 
10. False. Blood cholesterol levels in both men and women begin to go up around age 20. Women before menopause have levels that are lower than men of the same age. After menopause, a women's LDL-cholesterol level goes up--and so her risk for heart disease increases. For both men and women, heart disease is the number one cause of death. 
11.  True. Food labels have been changed. Look on the nutrition label for the amount of saturated fat, total fat, cholesterol, and total calories in a serving of the product. Use this information to compare similar products. Also, look for the list of ingredients. Here, the ingredient in the greatest amount is first and the ingredient in the least amount is last. So to choose foods low in saturated fat or total fat, go easy on products that list fats or oil first, or that list many fat and oil ingredients.





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